NPR: “The most ambitious and successfully realized literary project in recent memory”

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Oscar Wilde’s The Portrait of Dorian Grey, adapted by John Coulthart

We were thrilled to hear Lucia Silva’s wonderful review of The Graphic Canon on NPR:

Classics may be timeless, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make them new again. In The Graphic Canon, editor Russ Kick plucks the world’s most revered classics from their dusty, hallowed shelves, and remixes them with illustrations from today’s finest illustrators, graphic novelists and comic-book artists. Volume 1 begins with The Epic of Gilgamesh and takes you through Native American folktales, The Tale of Genji, Dante’s Inferno and Shakespeare, along with over 50 others. Volume 2 picks up with “Kubla Khan,” Austen, Poe, the Brontes, Moby Dick, The Picture of Dorian Gray and pretty much any other major and minor work you could think of in between. More than 100 different illustrators bring their truly awesome talents to the page in a mesmerizing mix of styles, with full color throughout. Each volume clocks in at 500 pages, each page the size of a full sheet of paper.

It’s funny, I haven’t read many classics, nor do I read many graphic novels or comics, and yet The Graphic Canon collections are the books I covet most this year. It’s easily the most ambitious and successfully realized literary project in recent memory, and certainly the one that’s most relevant for today’s readers. Now if only we could make it required reading for high school…

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Detail from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, adapted by Huxley King and Terrence Boyce

Thanks so much, Lucia! Click HERE to listen to NPR’s full 2012 comics roundup!

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